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Ramón Salaverría

Director of the Journalism Projects Department, University of Navarra

December 11th, 2012, Academia, English, Europe, Europe, Media, Northern Ireland, Portuguese, Spain, Spanish, The Expert Database

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Ramón Salaverría is Director of the Journalism Projects Department at the University of Navarra (Pamplona, Spain), where he has been teaching online journalism skills for nearly twenty years. Mr. Salaverría has been Chair of the Journalism Studies Section at the European Communication Research and Education Association (ECREA), during the term 2010-2012. Representing this association, he [...]

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Call for Applications: Digital Journalism Bootcamp in Tunisia

October 18th, 2012, Comment & Analysis

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The United Nations Alliance of Civilizations and Google are excited to announce North Africa’s first bootcamp on innovative and web journalism! We’re looking for 20 journalists and bloggers from Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco with a passion for innovative journalism and learning about cutting edge technology.

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Secrecy is the problem, not leakers

December 23rd, 2010, Comment & Analysis

WikiLeaks is now at the centre of a global battle between media and those in power but what’s new about what Julian Assange is doing? WikiLeaks is much more than just another journalistic scandal, it is a challenge to the way that power and news media operate in the Internet Age.

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David Andelman

Editor, World Policy Journal

July 14th, 2010, Asia, Business and Globalization, Defense and Security, English, Europe, French, International Relations, Iraq, Journalist/Commentator, Media, New York, North America, Think tank/Research center, USA, War and Conflict

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David A. Andelman is the Editor of World Policy Journal and President of the Overseas Press Club. He is former Executive Editor of Forbes.com, and correspondent for The New York Times.

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When it comes to religion, journalistic standards don’t count anymore

May 6th, 2010, Comment & Analysis

When it comes to religion, there is a high level of stereotype-driven reporting that ignores the old-school journalism standard of utilizing the famous 5 W’s: Who did What When Where and Why. But overcoming the stereotype-driven marginalization of religion and religious leaders will not only improve balanced reporting and the overall quality of journalism. It will tell those who are involved in religious communities that newspapers and magazines are trying harder to provide a more coherent and realistic picture of the world.

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When it comes to religion, journalistic standards don't count anymore

May 6th, 2010, Comment & Analysis

When it comes to religion, there is a high level of stereotype-driven reporting that ignores the old-school journalism standard of utilizing the famous 5 W’s: Who did What When Where and Why. But overcoming the stereotype-driven marginalization of religion and religious leaders will not only improve balanced reporting and the overall quality of journalism. It will tell those who are involved in religious communities that newspapers and magazines are trying harder to provide a more coherent and realistic picture of the world.

Continue reading »

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